6 Interesting Historical Sites in Massachusetts

I’ve been thinking about history a lot lately…and a history I haven’t been able to visit – YET. Currently I’m planning a trip to the Great Mass before we head over to Spain.

While America has a relatively short history, there are plenty of important and interesting events to learn about and historical markers to visits. One state where you can find historical sites anywhere you go is Massachusetts. The state was the home of the first permanent English settlement in the 1600s, so it has one of the longest and richest histories out of any state. You can’t plan a visit to Massachusetts without visiting at least one of its many historical sites. Learning more about history can make every trip you go on more interesting, even if you’re looking at Banff homes for sale.

Next time you’re in Massachusetts, make sure you visit these six historical sites. 

The House of the Seven Gables:

This 1668 mansion was the inspiration behind Nathaniel Hawthorne’s 1851 novel of the same name. It’s currently one of the oldest homes in America. Despite many renovations, the home still has many of the original features from when it was first built, as well as many references to Hawthorne’s novel. A tour through the mansion is the perfect way of getting to know more about Salem’s history throughout the centuries since its founding. 

Freedom Trail:

It can be hard to visit all the historical sites you want in Massachusetts, especially in Boston. One way to get to multiple important locations is through the Freedom Trail. This two and a half mile-trail through Boston takes you past some of the most famous historical spots in the country. You can walk this trail either by yourself, as the trial is marked along the way, or as part of a group to learn more. Just a few places you’ll pass on the trail are the Old State House, the Paul Revere House, and the Bunker Hill Monument.

Plimoth Plantation:

A trip to the living history museum at Plimoth Plantation will give you a more in-depth look at Native American tribes and early English colonies in Massachusetts. The Wampanoag Homesite includes examples of how Native Americans lived during the 17th century, including how they made food and homes. In the English village, you can find historically accurate artifacts that early settlers would have had with them. The museum even includes a full-scale replica of the Mayflower ship. 

Louisa May Alcott Orchard House:

Like the House of the Seven Gables, the Louisa May Alcott Orchard House gives visitors a closer look at some of America’s literary history. Although the home was originally built in the 17th century, it’s known for being where Louisa May Alcott wrote Little Women, as well as where the novel is set. The house is now a museum and still has many of the features that the home had when the Alcotss lived there. 

The Paul Revere House:

One of the most famous patriots in American history is Paul Revere. Everyone is familiar with his story, which makes his Boston home one of the best historical sites to visit in the city. The home is where Paul Revere lived at the time of the American Revolution and where he was when he left to spread the word that British soldiers had arrived. It’s also the oldest residential building in downtown Boston, being built in 1680. 

The Witch House at Salem:

Of course, one of the most famous events that happened in Massachusetts was the Salem Witch Trials. While the exact year the home was built isn’t known, it’s the only structure still standing that has ties to the witch trials. During the time of the witch trials, the home was owned by the judge who was involved with sending multiple people to be hung. The museum gives visitors a look at life in Salem and how the witch trials occurred. 

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